Why Protein Powder May Aid Your Weight-Loss Efforts – Telegraph

Check out any fitness junkie’s kitchen, and you’ll probably find a jar of protein powder lying around. Although it has a rep fit for bodybuilding competitions, protein powder isn’t just for people who are looking to boost their muscles—nutritionists say it can also help you lose weight if you use it correctly.

First things first, when it comes to health and weight loss, there is no magic bullet. Whether you want to get healthy or lose weight (and they're not always the same thing), it's a gradual process, and what works for some people doesn't work for others. If you do want to lose weight, it's important to think about why—and whether doing so is a healthy decision for your life right now. For example, if you have a history of disordered eating, you should talk to your doctor before starting a new eating plan. And even if you don't, you'll want to set healthy, rational expectations for yourself. When it comes down to it, weight loss is about a lot more than whether you throw some protein powder into your smoothie. It’s important to factor in whether you’re getting good rest and trying to keep your stress levels down, plus elements outside of your control, like health conditions and hormones. Most of all, treat yourself kindly, and don't rush the process. Success takes time.

Now, whether or not you're trying to lose weight or perhaps quell the constant hunger pangs you suspect are due to eating too little protein, protein powder may help. It's hard to overstate how important protein is, since the macronutrient is essential for building muscle and helping keep you full. And protein powder, which comes in multiple forms, is an easy way to make sure you're getting as much protein as you need (around 10 to 35 percent of your daily calories, depending on various factors) and maximizing its weight loss potential. “Protein is digested slowly and gives you more of a feeling of fullness than other macronutrients, which in turn can help you consume fewer calories,” Kacie Vavrek, M.S., R.D., C.S.S.D., L.D., at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, tells SELF. It also doesn't cause blood sugar spikes, which make you feel hungry again quickly, as much as more sugary or carb-laden foods.

“Having a protein shake as a snack when you have a long time (more than four hours) between meals can help keep you satiated, so you won't be as tempted to have unhealthy snacks or overeat when you do finally have your next meal,” Albert Matheny , M.S., R.D., C.S.C.S., of SoHo Strength Lab and Promix Nutrition , tells SELF. Plus, protein powder can help you increase your protein intake without adding a lot of extra calories or fat, thus potentially leading to weight loss, he explains.

Consuming enough protein also helps prevent muscle loss, which is important because muscle is more metabolically active than fat—any time muscle is lost, your metabolism can decrease. That's why Matheny recommends making sure to get protein in within 30 minutes after strength training to refuel glycogen (i.e. energy) stores in your muscles. Your body is primed to take in nutrients to help repair your muscles after you work out, which is why timing is important, he explains.

But not all protein powders are created equal. Plant-based forms often digest more slowly than other varieties, Sam Accardi, R.D., L.D.N., lead dietitian for the Charge Group , tells SELF. And if you reach for a whey-based protein powder , check to make sure it's not loaded with artificial sweeteners. Also, protein powder can torpedo your weight loss efforts if you don’t use it properly, Beth Warren, R.D.N., founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Living a Real Life With Real Food, tells SELF. Protein shakes can get a bit of a health halo, but they do contain calories, and taking in too much of anything can lead to weight gain, Warren says.

If you're ready to hop on the protein-powder bandwagon, Warren suggests looking for one with 12 to 15 grams of protein for serving. “The ones that are higher are most often combinations with added sugars, added amino acids, vitamins, and other ingredients that are not needed in excess,” she says. Once you're set on that front, just make sure you're not consuming so much protein you're suddenly feeling bloated —a common sign you're going overboard.

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7-Day Diet Meal Plan to Lose Weight: 1,200 Calories – Telegraph

This 1,200-calorie meal plan is designed by EatingWell's registered dietitians and culinary experts to offer healthy and delicious meals for weight-loss. We've done the hard work of planning for you and mapped out seven full days of meals and snacks. The calorie totals are listed next to each meal so you can easily swap things in and out as you see fit. Note, this meal plan is controlled for calories, fiber and sodium. If a particular nutrient is of concern, consider speaking with your health care provider about supplementation or altering this plan to better suit your individual nutrition needs.

See all of our healthy weight-loss meal plans here!

Plan Ahead

If you will be short on time, you can make the Ravioli & Vegetable Soup ahead. Other things you can make ahead for the week include the Carrot-Ginger Vinaigrette, Maple-Nut Granola and the Avocado-Yogurt Dip.

Day 1

Pictured Recipe: Ravioli & Vegetable Soup

Breakfast (266 calories)
Avocado-Egg Toast
• 1 slice whole-grain bread
• 1/4 medium avocado
• 1 large egg, cooked in 1/4 tsp. olive oil or coat pan with a thin layer of cooking spray (1-second spray)
• Top egg with a pinch of salt and pepper (1/16 tsp. each)
• 1 clementine

Morning Snack (61 calories)
• 1/3 cup blueberries
• 1/4 cup plain non-fat Greek yogurt

Lunch (341 calories)
• 2 cups Ravioli & Vegetable Soup
• 1 Tomato-Cheddar Cheese Toast

Afternoon Snack (93 calories)
• 3 Tbsp. hummus
• 1 cup sliced cucumber

Dinner (451 calories)
Salmon & Vegetables
• 4 oz. baked salmon
• 1 cup roasted Brussels sprouts
• 1/2 cup brown rice
• 1 Tbsp. walnuts
• Salt and pepper to taste (1/8 tsp. each)
Vinaigrette
• Combine 1 1/2 tsp. each olive oil, lemon juice and maple syrup; season with salt to taste (1/8 tsp.).

Coat Brussels sprouts in 1/2 tsp. olive oil and bake at 425 degrees F until lightly browned, about 15-20 minutes. Coat salmon with 1/4 tsp. olive oil or a thin layer of cooking spray (1 second spray), add salt and pepper to taste (1/8 tsp. each). Bake at 425 degrees F until done, about 4-6 minutes. Serve brown rice, Brussels sprouts and salmon drizzled with vinaigrette and topped with walnuts.

Plan Ahead: Make the Maple-Nut Granola for tomorrow. You can also buy granola, to make things easier. Aim for a granola that has around 130 calories or less and less than 6 grams of sugar per 1/4 cup.

Day 2

Pictured Recipe: Delicata Squash & Tofu Curry

Breakfast (266 calories)
Avocado-Egg Toast
• 1 slice whole-grain bread
• 1/4 medium avocado
• 1 large egg, cooked in 1/4 tsp. olive oil or coat pan with a thin layer of cooking spray (1 second spray)
• Top egg with a pinch of pepper (1/16 tsp.)
• 1 clementine

Morning Snack (134 calories)
• 5 dried apricots
• 7 walnut halves

Lunch (295 calories)
Leftover soup
• 2 cups Ravioli & Vegetable Soup
• 1 clementine

Afternoon Snack (93 calories)
• 3 Tbsp. hummus
• 1 cup sliced cucumber

Dinner (424 calories)
• 1 1/2 cups Delicata Squash & Tofu Curry
• 1/2 cup brown rice

Plan Ahead: Hard-boil two eggs—save one for day five. Make the Carrot-Ginger Vinaigrette or opt for a healthy, store-bought Asian-style dressing. When buying salad dressing, choose one made with healthy fats, like olive oil or canola oil. Cook a chicken breast for tomorrow's lunch or substitute precooked chicken or sliced chicken or turkey breast from the grocery store. When choosing deli items, go for low-sodium, preservative-free options.

Day 3

Pictured Recipe: Moroccan-Style Stuffed Peppers

Breakfast (267 calories)
• 1/4 cup Maple-Nut Granola
• 3/4 cup plain non-fat Greek yogurt
• 1/2 cup blueberries

Morning Snack (35 calories)
• 1 clementine

Lunch (351 calories)
Apple & Cheddar Pita Pocket
• 1 whole-wheat pita round (6-1/2-inch)
• 1 Tbsp. mustard
• 1/2 medium apple, sliced
• 1 oz. Cheddar cheese
• 1 cup mixed greens
Cut pita in half and spread mustard inside. Fill with apple slices and cheese. Toast until the cheese begins to melt. Add greens and serve.

Afternoon Snack (47 calories)
• 1/2 medium apple

Dinner (457 calories)
• 1 serving (1 pepper) Moroccan-Style Stuffed Peppers
• 2 cups spinach
Sauté spinach in 1 tsp. of olive oil and a pinch of both salt and pepper (1/16 tsp. each)

Evening Snack (50 calories)
• 1 Tbsp. chocolate chips, preferably dark chocolate

Plan Ahead: Make the Avocado-Yogurt Dip for tomorrow. You can substitute store-bought hummus for the dip, if desired.

Day 4

Pictured Recipe: Warm Lentil Salad with Sausage & Apple

Breakfast (267 calories)
• 1/4 cup Maple-Nut Granola
• 3/4 cup plain non-fat Greek yogurt
• 1/2 cup blueberries

Morning Snack (83 calories)
• 1 hard boiled egg
• 1 tsp. hot sauce, if desired

Lunch (336 calories)
• 2 cups mixed greens
• 3 oz. cooked chicken breast
• 1/2 medium red bell pepper, sliced
• 1/4 cup grated carrots
• 1 clementine
• 2 Tbsp. Carrot-Ginger Vinaigrette
Combine ingredients & top salad with vinaigrette.

Afternoon Snack (86 calories)
• 4 dried apricots
• 4 walnut halves

Dinner (444 calories)
• 2 1/4 cup Warm Lentil Salad with Sausage & Apple
• 1/2 cup Quick Pickled Beets

Day 5

Pictured Recipe: Quick Chicken Tikka Masala

Breakfast (266 calories)
• 1 cup all-bran cereal
• 3/4-cup skim milk
• 1/2 cup blueberries

Morning Snack (101 calories)
• 2 medium carrots
• 2 Tbsp. Avocado-Yogurt Dip

Lunch (314 calories)
• 1 Tomato-Cheddar Cheese Toast
• 2 cups mixed greens
• 3 Tbsp. grated carrot
• 1/2 cup cucumber, sliced
• 1 hard-boiled egg
• 1 Tbsp. unsalted dry-roasted almonds
Top greens with grated carrot, cucumber, hard-boiled egg, almonds and 1 1/2 tsp. each olive oil & balsamic vinegar.

Afternoon Snack (93 calories)
• 3 dried apricots
• 1/3 cup plain non-fat Greek yogurt
• 1 1/2 tsp. chopped walnuts

Dinner (427 calories)
• 1 1/2 cups Quick Chicken Tikka Masala
• 1/2 cup brown rice

Plan Ahead: Cook a chicken breast for tomorrow's lunch or substitute precooked chicken or sliced chicken or turkey breast from the grocery store. When choosing deli items, go for low-sodium, preservative-free options.

Day 6

Pictured Recipe: Korean Beef Stir-Fry

Breakfast (266 calories)
• 1 cup all-bran cereal
• 3/4-cup skim milk
• 1/2 cup blueberries

Morning Snack (66 calories)
• 2 Tbsp. Avocado-Yogurt Dip
• 1 cup sliced cucumber

Lunch (325 calories)
Leftover Chicken Tikka Masala
• 1 1/2 cups Quick Chicken Tikka Masala
• 1 cup spinach
Reheat the chicken on top of the spinach in the microwave.

Afternoon Snack (35 calories)
• 1 clementine

Dinner (507 calories)
• 2 cups Korean Beef Stir-Fry
• 1/2 cup, cooked buckwheat soba noodles (about 1 ounce dry noodles)

Day 7

Pictured Recipe: Wild Mushroom Pizza with Arugula & Pecorino

Breakfast (266 calories)
• 1 cup all-bran cereal
• 3/4-cup skim milk
• 1/2 cup blueberries

Morning Snack (117 calories)
• 4 Tbsp. Avocado-Yogurt Dip
• 1 cup sliced cucumber

Lunch (301 calories)
• 2 cups mixed greens
• 3 oz. cooked chicken breast
• 1/2 medium red bell pepper, sliced
• 1/4 cup grated carrots
• 2 Tbsp. Carrot-Ginger Vinaigrette
Combine ingredients and top salad with vinaigrette.

Afternoon Snack (42 calories)
• 5 dried apricots

Dinner (494 calories)
• 1 serving (1/4 pizza) Wild Mushroom Pizza with Arugula & Pecorino

Watch How to Make Ravioli & Vegetable Soup

More Diet Meal Plans and Diet Recipes